Tennessee Rolled Back Its Reopening Plans as COVID Surges


circle

Spirits may have lifted across the U.S. during the first week of vaccinations, but recent health data paints a far more dire situation right in front of us. Case levels are at record highs from coast to coast, but none worse than the current hardest-hit state: Tennessee, where officials rolled back their reopening plans and instituted a limit on gatherings to quell COVID surges. Read on to see what’s being done to stop the spread of the virus in the Volunteer State, and for more on the new strain of COVID, check out Dr. Fauci Advises Against This One COVID Safety Measure.

During a live video address on Dec. 20, Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee issued an executive order that’s in place until Jan. 19 that prohibits more than 10 people from gathering in public. Lee also urged citizens to limit celebrating Christmas to just members of their household and asked employers to allow employees to work from home for the next 30 days, the Tennesseean reports.

Notably, the new orders fell short of implementing a statewide mask mandate, which Lee has avoided against the advice of federal health officials. Tennessee, which Lee described as “ground zero for a surge in sickness,” is currently seeing 132.1 daily new cases per 100,000 people as of Dec. 21, according to Covid Act Now.

“I understand deeply how much Tennessee families need each other,” Lee said while emphasizing the importance of celebrating the holidays responsibly. “But we must do all that we can to blunt this surge and keep more Tennesseans from getting sick.”

Other local officials warned that the state is on the precipice of catastrophe and pleaded with the public to follow new orders and advisories. “If we have another surge over Christmas, it will break our hospitals,” Lisa Piercey, Tennessee Health Commissioner, said at a news conference.

But while Tennessee may be seeing the worst coronavirus outbreak at the moment, the state is far from alone: according to Covid Act Now as of Dec. 21, 11 states are currently ranked in the highest designation: “extreme outbreak.” Read on to see which places are the worst affected, and for more on signs you may have contracted the disease, check out These 2 Strange Symptoms Could Mean You’ve Already Had COVID.

Read the original article on Best Life.

cityscape photo of Little Rock, Arkansas at night
Shutterstock

75.5 daily new cases per 100,000 people

Saturated early morning light hits the buildings and architecture of downtown Wilmington Delaware
iStock

75.6 daily new cases per 100,000 people

And for more on how the vaccine program is playing out where you live, check out These States Are Getting Less of the COVID Vaccine Than They Were Told.

cityscape photo of trees, buildings, and brown mountains in Salt Lake City, Utah
Shutterstock

76 daily new cases per 100,000 people

las vegas strip in nevada
Shutterstock

77.6 daily new cases per 100,000 people

And for more regular COVID updates, sign up for our daily newsletter.

huntsville alabama skyline
Shutterstock

78.1 daily new cases per 100,000 people

Indianapolis, Indiana, USA downtown cityscape on the White River at dusk.
iStock

82.7 daily new cases per 100,000 people

And for more on what to avoid if you’re on the road, check out The 4 Things You Shouldn’t Do at a Hotel During COVID, Doctor Warns.

cityscape photo of downtown Tulsa, Oklahoma at night
iStock

83.6 daily new cases per 100,000 people

An aerial view of downtown Phoenix, Arizona and the surrounding urban area.
iStock

88.2 daily new cases per 100,000 people

And for more on how the coronavirus is keeping officials on their toes, check out A White House Official Just Gave This Warning About the New COVID Mutation.

providence skyline rhode island
Shutterstock

94.3 daily new cases per 100,000 people

boats, pier, and city skyline of Long Beach, California
Shutterstock

108.1 daily new cases per 100,000 people

Tennessee
Shutterstock

132.1 daily new cases per 100,000 people

And for more on when you can expect your jab, check out If You Did This in 2020, You Can Get Your COVID Vaccine Sooner.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *